NASCAR Racing:Talladega

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brewster_540Welcome race fans to my blog. The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series is at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, AL. this weekend. The NASCAR Camping World Truck Series is also there this weekend. On Friday, there were two practice sessions for the Sprint Cup drivers. The Talladega race is an impound race. That means that there will be no practice after qualifying. But, instead, the cars will be impounded after qualifying and no work will be done on the cars. What they have is what they race with. But maybe they should look at this again. The trucks also qualified on Friday.

On Saturday, it is raining. So Coors Lite Pole qualifying was canceled. This means they will line up according to owner points, putting 48 Jimmy Johnson on the pole, as he is leading in the points. In my opinion, it might have been better to have had qualifying on Friday and skip Happy Hour on Saturday. But that’s just my opinion.

44 teams showed up to qualify at Talladega. But only 43 will be able to race. Seams rather silly to me, as this race track is 2.66 miles long and there is room for one more car filling the 22nd row. But I don’t make the rules. As it is, with qualifying rained out, those not locked into the top 35 in owner points get in on attempts made. Regan Smith in the 78 car is on a limited schedule and has not attempted all the races. That would put him out of this race. However, lucky for Regan, 37 Tony Raines decided to bow out of the race. Letting Regan get the final spot.

Talladega Superspeedway gives the fans a great race every time. The engines are restricted with a plate to give less horsepower and thus slow the cars down. As a result, all the cars drive at about the same speed, putting them into one big pack. To me, this is exciting. Watching them race three wide, twelve rows deep is exciting. The only problem is that when one driver makes a mistake, the whole field gets involved. As a result, there are some spectacular crashes here. I personally like the three wide racing, but don’t like to see the crashes. Many fans watch the race to see the crashes.

After Carl Edwards flew into the catch fence in the spring race, just before the Finish Line, they made the catch fence eight feet taller. So that debris wouldn’t get into the stands.

There is also a rule here and at Daytona, the other plate race, that you can’t drive below the double yellow line to make a pass. However, in my opinion, this rule needs to be tweaked. Last year Tony Stewart bumped Regan Smith below the line. Regan was supposed to give the spot back. But the Finish Line was right there. And if he had done so, he would have caused a big wreck. As it was, he didn’t win the race and was put back to the 18th position. In the Spring race this year, Dale Earnheardt, Jr. got a run on the bottom, and Brian Vickers dove down to block him, putting Jr. below the line. Jr. moved up to get back on the track and got into Brian, who got into the rest of the pack. At the end of the race, Brad Keselowski pushed Carl Edwards into the lead. When the Checkers were in sight, Brad let Carl go, to try to win the race. Carl blocked, Brad stood his ground, and Carl flew into the catch fence.

In my opinion, the double yellow line rule should not be in effect on the last lap. What a great ending it would be with the cars racing 4 or 5 wide going for the Checkers! Regan would have won his first race.  Brad could have gone below the line to avoid contact with Carl. And they could have raced to the line. Although, it seems to me that blocking is the problem, not the line. If Brian hadn’t blocked, Jr. wouldn’t have had to get back on the track. If Tony hadn’t blocked, Regan wouldn’t have been below the line and could have won. If Kyle Busch hadn’t blocked Tony, Kyle wouldn’t have crashed near the Finish line. It’s blocking that causes the crashes. In my opinion.

Brought to you by Sheila Hawley

Visit my site. I’ll be back after the race.

 

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